Expressing Agreement: Using “So” and “Neither”

In English, we often use the words “so” and “neither” to express agreement with someone`s statement or opinion. These words are used in response to a statement made by someone else, and indicate that the speaker shares the same view. Both “so” and “neither” are common, but they are used in slightly different ways. In this article, we will explore how to use these two words effectively.

Using “So”

“So” is often used to express agreement with a positive statement. For example, if someone says “I love watching movies,” you can respond with “So do I!” This shows that you share their love of movies. Here are some other examples of how “so” can be used:

– Statement: “I think it`s going to rain tomorrow.”

Response: “So do I. We should bring umbrellas just in case.”

– Statement: “I really enjoy swimming in the ocean.”

Response: “So do I! The water is so refreshing.”

– Statement: “I`m a big fan of classic rock music.”

Response: “So am I! Led Zeppelin is my favorite band.”

Using “Neither”

“Neither” is used to express agreement with a negative statement. For example, if someone says “I don`t like sushi,” you can respond with “Neither do I.” This shows that you share their dislike of sushi. Here are some other examples of how “neither” can be used:

– Statement: “I can`t stand horror movies.”

Response: “Neither can I. They give me nightmares.”

– Statement: “I`m not a big fan of spicy food.”

Response: “Neither am I. I prefer mild flavors.”

– Statement: “I don`t think I`m going to go to the party tonight.”

Response: “Neither am I. I have a lot of work to do.”

Tips for Using “So” and “Neither”

When using these words to express agreement, it`s important to keep a few tips in mind:

1. Use the right word. “So” is used for positive statements, while “neither” is used for negative statements.

2. Pay attention to the tense of the statement. If the original statement is in the present tense, use the present tense in your response. If it`s in the past tense, use the past tense in your response.

3. Use “too” instead of “so” if the statement is about yourself. For example, if you say “I love chocolate,” someone can respond with “Me too!” instead of “So do I!”

Conclusion

Using “so” and “neither” to express agreement is a common and useful practice in English. It shows that you are actively listening to what others are saying and that you share their views. By keeping these tips in mind and practicing using these words in conversation, you will become more effective at expressing agreement and building positive relationships with others.